Abraham Lincoln’s Infamous Pittsburgh Address!

Scroll down to content

Given at the National Aviary, the site of the Blogger War Western State Detention Center, built in 1826, and burned to the ground by an angry mob in 1882. This was infamous as an uncivil retention camp for un-like-able WordPress bloggers, for which there were far too many.

17 Replies to “Abraham Lincoln’s Infamous Pittsburgh Address!”

    1. He May of Been:

      Throughout his life, Lincoln consulted oracles; at age 22, he was told by a seer that he would become president of the United States. In his dreams, he foresaw his own sudden death. Trauma and heartbreak opened the psychic door for this president, whose precognitive dreams, evil omens, and trance-like states are carefully documented in this bold and poignant chronicle of tragic beginnings, White House séances, and paranormal eruptions of the Civil War era.

      The Psychic Life of Abraham Lincoln, Susan B. Martinez

      Liked by 2 people

  1. This is why he was assassinated, he knew too much. Dude was spitting straight facts and they was like nah son, we ain’t gonna be having that no more! Bam! Bam! 😱

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton:

      If you’ve heard of Edwin Stanton, it’s probably because of what he did after Abraham Lincoln’s assassination in 1865. Even as the Civil War president lay dying, Stanton went to work in an adjoining room — issuing orders to protect other leaders, directing generals’ movements and informing the nation of Lincoln’s death. He also began the search for the assassin and his co-conspirators.

      “He did not announce that he was taking charge: he simply was in charge,” writes historian Walter Stahr in Stanton: Lincoln’s War Secretary.

      Stanton’s aggressive tactics that night and over the ensuing weeks have contributed to the dark side of his reputation. Some have seen him using the tragedy to empower himself, or even suspected him of involvement in the plot.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: